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4 Simple Strategies to Extend Your Content’s Lifespan

2018-01-10

If you’ve ever spent an extended amount of time creating content, you’ll know how disheartening it can be to watch a 20-hour project get 20 minutes of attention on Twitter. While all your content can’t be evergreen content, it’s important to understand that evergreen content isn’t the only way to keep your old social media posts alive. With the strategies below, you can learn a few simple ways to repurpose some of your better posts and generate fresh content with relative ease.

#1 Take Advantage of LinkedIn Publisher

You’re probably thought about republishing your content through Twitter or Facebook, but have you thought about LinkedIn? Many social media sites are inherently hostile towards long-form content. From Twitter’s character limit to the image-orientation of Instagram’s content, not just any platform is a good place to launch your next essay.

But LinkedIn is a great place for long-form content. The site is packed with professionals who are interested in knowing all the dirty details, which may be why the average LinkedIn post is in the neighborhood of 2,000 words. You’ll definitely appreciate LinkedIn’s ability to use multiple images in your post, ensuring your content looks and reads as smoothly as it would on your own website.

#2 If Content is Lengthy, Repurpose It

Almost any long piece of content can sensibly be broken into smaller parts. If you’ve produced an e-book, speech, study, or white paper, you’ll find portions of that content can be published in smaller quantities.  Long posts are great if your visitor is looking for an essay, but people who want the abridged version take their clicks elsewhere.  Taking your longer content and breaking it down into individual posts don’t just extend the lifespan of that work, it solves problems for your audience by making your information more approachable.

Helped by new images and subheadings, you should be able to take one lengthy post and translate it into half a dozen new pieces of content. The same can be said of podcasts, speeches, and other presentations you’ve given in the past. Strategies like this work exceptionally well when you’ve expanded your expertise in the time since creating the original post, which can help you refine the points you’ve made in the past.

#3 Republish, Republish, Republish

If you’ve published on LinkedIn before, consider taking an encore. Content that has proven valuable is always worth reusing. Your best content is the kind of first impression you want to make use of when finding new fans, as it engages people who only started following you recently with some of the best you have to offer.

As a general practice, you’ll want to allow at least three weeks from the original publishing date before you republish something. Grace periods like this can help a search engine determine which content is original and which is republished, allowing you to avoid SEO problems down the road.

If you’re reposting something provided by a guest poster or created by another company, be sure to mention to your audience where they can find the original author.  And don’t forget to create entirely new headlines for your reposted content, especially as you republish across several platforms. For instance, you might change “Six Reasons to See Things” to “Six Reasons Facebook Fans Should See Things.”

#4 Draw Ideas from the Past

Take a moment to look at some of your successful content in the past. What made it successful? In what way did people connect with it? Simply reevaluating what you’ve already done can lead to significant advances in your lead generation, traffic, and dozens of other important metrics. It’s all about understanding how you connect with your audience, and what you can do for them. But as long as your new content doesn’t fail to provide value, there’s nothing wrong with a little recycling.

Content creation is a challenge for most companies to keep up on but leveraging these tactics could help you to extend the life of your existing content and keep it interesting for your readers.


Joanne is an accomplished marketing and sales leader with over seventeen years of experience defining corporate marketing and sales strategies, managing sales and marketing teams, and closing new business with Fortune 1000 customers across a wide range of vertical markets.